Knots in Time

With season’s endyou topple to the ground,aching, broken limbsheld aloft by briny handsthat bare you proudlyto their sunken home. Drifting. With hushed reverenceyou plunge into the laminate,embraced in placeby cold and surging tides. Drifting. You sail through crystal watersand mother-of-pearl skies,skimming ragged currentsacross this frozen,breaking kingdom. Drifting. Washed up on frigid shores,your weathered bodyshimmers in […]

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Are Google and smartphones degrading our memories?

Forgetting a child in the car is a parent’s worst nightmare, but some experts say our ability to remember even the most crucial tasks can be hijacked by something as simple as a missing cue. According to Harvard psychologist Daniel L. Schacter, tragic cases of forgotten children started to rise near the turn of the millennium, […]

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Scientists look beyond the individual brain to study the collective mind

In a new paper, scientists suggest that efforts to understand human cognition should expand beyond the study of individual brains. They call on neuroscientists to incorporate evidence from social science disciplines to better understand how people think. “Accumulating evidence indicates that memory, reasoning, decision-making and other higher-level functions take place across people,” the researchers wrote […]

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Lab-grown ‘mini brains’ hint at treatments for neurodegenerative diseases

Cambridge researchers have developed ‘mini brains’ that allow them to study a fatal and untreatable neurological disorder causing paralysis and dementia – and for the first time have been able to grow these for almost a year. A common form of motor neurone disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often overlaps with frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) and can […]

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Physicists Snap First Image of an ‘Electron Ice’

More than 90 years ago, physicist Eugene Wigner predicted that at low densities and cold temperatures, electrons that usually zip through materials would freeze into place, forming an electron ice, or what has been dubbed a Wigner crystal. While physicists have obtained indirect evidence that Wigner crystals exist, no one has been able to snap a […]

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Skyrmions Could Be Future of Computing; X-Ray Experiments Reveal Their Secrets

Scientists have known for a long time that magnetism is created by the spins of electrons lining up in certain ways. But about a decade ago, they discovered another astonishing layer of complexity in magnetic materials: Under the right conditions, these spins can form skyrmions, little vortexes or whirlpools that act like particles and move around […]

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Body’s ability to prevent cell damage hampered by excess carbs

Ahigh body mass index (BMI) is closely correlated with insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. For decades, nutrition guidelines have emphasized the necessity of decreasing intake of dietary fats. Yet, even as studies demonstrate ties between foods laden with simple carbohydrates and metabolic dysfunction, much remains unknown about how the body processes large amounts of […]

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“Like a magic trick,” certain proteins pass through cell walls

For decades, scientists have wondered how large molecules such as proteins pass through cell walls, also known as plasma membranes, without leaving a trace. That ability is part of what makes certain drugs ­­­­– including some cancer treatments and the COVID-19 vaccine – work. And it is also how bacterial toxins enter human cells and […]

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Machine Learning Can Be Fair and Accurate

Carnegie Mellon University researchers are challenging a long-held assumption that there is a trade-off between accuracy and fairness when using machine learning to make public policy decisions. As the use of machine learning has increased in areas such as criminal justice, hiring, health care delivery and social service interventions, concerns have grown over whether such […]

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