Brain Drain: Scientists Explain Why Neurons Consume So Much Fuel Even When at Rest

Pound for pound, the brain consumes vastly more energy than other organs, and, puzzlingly, it remains a fuel-guzzler even when its neurons are not firing signals called neurotransmitters to each other. Now researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine have found that the process of packaging neurotransmitters may be responsible for this energy drain. In their study, reported […]

Read More

COVID-19 infection can be inhibited by elements of the human microbiome

Researchers have identified metabolites, intermediate or end products of metabolism, in the human microbiome that inhibit COVID-19 infection in cell-based models of the virus. The finding, reported this week in the journal mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, is yet another example of the wealth of information that can be gained by studying […]

Read More

We prefer farmed salmon – as long as we don’t know what we’re eating

A great many packages of sliced and vacuum-sealed smoked salmon find their way into Danish shopping carts every year. The vast majority of this smoked salmon is sourced from Norwegian aquaculture farms. In recent times conventionally farmed salmon from Norway has earned a questionable reputation and notoriety for containing pharmaceutical and chemical residues, as well as […]

Read More

Spending revenues on climate projects maximises social acceptability of carbon taxes

The creation of a carbon tax would be more widely accepted by the public if the revenue raised were used to finance climate projects. This is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), which analyses the fact that how governments spend revenues influences the acceptance and […]

Read More

Astronomers discover hot, dense planet with eight-hour year

An international team involving researchers at UCL has discovered a new planet, GJ 367 b, whose surface temperature may reach 1,500 degrees Centigrade – hot enough to melt all rock and metal – and which takes only eight hours to orbit its star. In a new study, published in the Science journal, the researchers show that the […]

Read More

Arctic rain may soon be more common than snowfall

Projections from the latest models, published by an international team of researchers in the journal Nature Communications, show a steep increase in the rate and range of precipitation expected to fall in the Arctic, and that most of these future events will be rain. This shift is occurring due to rapid warming, sea ice loss, and poleward […]

Read More

Molecular device turns infrared into visible light

Light is an electromagnetic wave: it consists of oscillating electric and magnetic fields propagating through space. Every wave is characterized by its frequency, which refers to the number of oscillations per second, measured in Hertz (Hz). Our eyes can detect frequencies between 400 and 750 trillion Hz (or terahertz, THz), which define the visible spectrum. […]

Read More

Seizures and memory problems in epilepsy may have a common cause

Damage to a part of the brain that regulates hyperactivity can contribute to both memory problems and seizures in the most common form of epilepsy, according to research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The study, published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience, may lead to earlier diagnosis of epilepsy and possibly new ways to treat epilepsy […]

Read More

Study finds daytime meals may reduce health risks linked to night shift work

A small clinical trial supported by the National Institutes of Health has found that eating during the nighttime—like many shift workers do—can increase glucose levels, while eating only during the daytime might prevent the higher glucose levels now linked with a nocturnal work life. The findings, the study authors said, could lead to novel behavioral […]

Read More